Category Archives: Immigration Info

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Who Can Apply for U.S. Citizenship

Find out who is eligible for U.S. citizenship and how to apply. U.S. citizenship gives a person as many rights as the U.S. has to offer; for example, the right to vote, petition for family members to immigrate, and live abroad without losing the right to return. For these reasons, citizenship is not easily obtained. To become a U.S. citizen through the process known as naturalization, you must first have a green card (permanent residence) and then meet other requirements,

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Obtaining Proof of U.S. Citizenship

If you have a right to U.S. citizenship, what’s next? If you believe you are a U.S. citizen, you’ll want a document to prove it. If you were born on U.S. soil and there is a record of your birth, a standard U.S. birth certificate issued by a state government is your primary proof of U.S. citizenship. (Birth certificates issued by hospitals are not official records and do not serve as proof of citizenship.) If you were naturalized in the

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U.S. Citizenship by Birth or Through Parents

You may already be a U.S. citizen by birth or naturalization and not know it. U.S. citizenship can be obtained in one of four ways: birth in the United States or its territories birth to U.S. citizen parents (called “acquisition” of citizenship) naturalization (obtaining citizenship after an application and exam), or naturalization of one’s parents (called “derivation” of citizenship). Some people are already U.S. citizens and don’t know it. Most of these people fall into one of three groups: People

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How the Child Status Protection Act (CSPA) Helps Immediate Relatives of U.S. Citizens

Turning 21 is cause for concern when the beneficiary is the child of a U.S. lawful permanent resident, but the immigration law adds some legal protections. The Child Status Protection Act (CSPA) was enacted in 2002 to help young people who turned 21 years old before U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and the U.S. Department of State (DOS) approved their green card applications. Due to lengthy delays on the green card waitlist and standard USCIS and DOS processing times,

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How the CSPA Helps Family-Based Preference Relatives and Derivative Beneficiaries

Turning 21 no longer destroys children’s eligibility as it used to — learn the details here. The Child Status Protection Act (CSPA) of 2002 was a great step forward in addressing the lengthy wait times that often blocked good faith attempts by U.S. citizens and permanent residents to apply for green cards for unmarried children under age 21. Prior to the CSPA, many children with pending immigrant visa petitions “aged out” — that is, lost their eligibility — if a

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Filling Out Form I-130 for Adult Son or Daughter (Over 21) of U.S. Permanent Resident

Preparing the initial visa petition required to bring a green card holder’s adult child to the U.S. If you are a U.S. green card holder (permanent resident), you may be able to petition for your foreign-born children who are age 21 or older (referred to as “sons or daughters” by U.S. immigration law) to immigrate to the U.S. and receive lawful permanent residence (green cards). To start this process, you will need to prepare and submit a visa petition on

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President Obama Breaks His Promise on Administrative Relief

The New York Times reports on Saturday that White House officials have confirmed President Obama will not keep his promise to the American people and forego an announcement on Administrative Relief.  The report indicates the President will not act before the Mid-Term elections in November. The following is my response to the announcement delay: I am extremely frustrated, hurt, and angry at the news that political ambitions by Democrats and others played a role in forcing the hand of President Obama to

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How to Help a Detainee in an Immigration Hold

If someone you know has been detained after an immigration hold, here are the first things to do. An immigration hold (also called a detainer) refers to when an undocumented or illegal immigrant who is already in jail is held, often past the person’s scheduled release date, for transfer to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). The hold lasts for 48 hours, during which time ICE is supposed to pick the person up. (If it doesn’t, then technically you can argue

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The Immigration Hold Process After Jail

When an immigrant is detained by law enforcement for an alleged crime, he or she may be placed on an “immigration hold” or “immigration detainer”. Here’s how the process works. When a foreign national is in state or federal custody (that is, jail) and comes to the attention of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) — possibly through one of its branches, including Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) or Customs and Border Protection (CBP) — a so-called “immigration hold” may be placed

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Overview of The Removal (Deportation) Hearings Process

Learn about the various hearings you’ll need to attend, and what will happen, when your facing removal from the United States. Once referred to as “deportation”, removal is the process of the U.S. government determining that an alien — that is, a non-U.S. citizen, whether in the U.S. illegally or with a green card — must be removed from the United States. The removal or deportation process is complicated, and the stakes are high. Legal representation is essential to develop

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